09 Feb

Interviewing Kids

> I am afraid I was in meetings all day and couldn’t catch a minute to call. Do you have any time tomorrow? I am EST.

>

> I did a lot of testing of tech for kids in a previous job, but I had taught students previously. The biggest tips I have are:

> Allow kids a bit more freedom in answering, when you can. For example: Rather than rate your level of interest, 1-5 (or sad face to happy face), do a two part, 1. How much did you enjoy/like this (sad face to happy face) & 2. What was one part you thought was cool?

>

> Allow time for quiet. Kids between 2nd and 3rd grade are still developing abstract thinking. They need a little more processing time. Silence is often a sign of engagement.

>

> Write questions that don’t sound like they are pandering. I avoided words like fun, cool, awesome. No one wants to be talked down to, especially kids.

>

> Kids are particularly sensitive to test-like situations. So sometimes I front-loaded test like questions and then gave them positive responses, (great, you got this), and then put in the meaty ones.

>

> I was generally testing content in interactives, so I would get kids to try to draw analogies to things they knew. For example: “Thanks for playing. You got it quickly. Did you have any questions? Well, I have a couple more questions for you. I want to describe the game to other people. Can you help? Maybe explain the game using examples you already play.”

>

> Finally, I am not sure how your set up is, but we used a lot of physical behavior as feedback data, like smiling, gesturing, etc. For a number of 2nd and 3rd grade boys, particularly, these are telling communication modes.

>

%d bloggers like this: